"Husbands, love your wives, even as Christ also loved the church, and gave himself for it;"
Eph 5:25

Sunday, June 2, 2013

To Provide ...

"You should provide well for your family."

This message is clearly heard by almost every Christian husband I know.  Husbands must love their wives and provide for their households. Paul warns us about this in his first letter to Timothy.

But if anyone does not provide for his relatives, and especially for members of his household, he has denied the faith and is worse than an unbeliever. (1 Timothy 5:8)

I know what it means when someone refers to a husband as a good provider.  I also recognize it as the worldly viewpoint it truly is.  To be a good provider means to bring home a lot of money.  Right?



We have to be careful when we talk about providing for our families.  As husbands, we must be a living example of God's love poured out to our wives and families.  God's love is extravagant, far beyond what we deserve.  But let's not misunderstand.  God does not always give us everything we want.  He does, however, always gives us what we need.


How does this translate into my skills as a husband and provider?


The world tells us that to provide well means to have a high paying job. I don't have that.

The world says I should own at least a few acres of land. I own 1/4 acre, most of which is occupied by a house.

The world says I should take my family on a great vacation every year. Our annual vacation consists of one week with the entire extended family at my father-in-law's timeshare at the Jersey Shore.

Many husbands, like me, have to live within a strict budget to make ends meet.  We have to get a pound of value from an ounce of silver.  The result is that sometimes husbands have to forgo worldly generosity in order to provide for the needs of their households.

How does this affect me personally?

Nothing would make me happier than to be able to sell this little house and buy a huge place in the country that has everything everyone wants.  Lots of acreage (half wooded, half clear), climbing trees, huge vegetable garden, a bedroom for each person.  The whole kit and kaboodle.

But when you take, for example, a $100 bill and split it into twenty portions to accommodate the many budget categories of a household, you end up buying a solid but ugly $5 garage sale chair for the living room.  BOOM!  You have provided for your household.

The above example is slightly ridiculous but true.  Sometimes what a husband has to do is provide needs and develop a thick skin.  The wants of the household are important, but sometimes they have to come to fruition later on.

Just thinking out loud,

The Genuine Husband 


10 comments:

  1. I'm reading the Little House on the Prairie series right now. What a great example of a provider Charles was. His family learned to appreciate what little they had. A priceless value to bestow on children.

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  2. A great series and a great example of God's love for His children. They didn't always have what they wanted, but they were always sustained by His hand, no matter the circumstances.

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  3. What happens when your husband can't provide for his family? What if he has been unemployed for years? A recent study has shown that women are the breadwinners in 40% of American households. These are trying times for families. As a wife, I remember my vows were "for better or worse, richer or poorer, etc." If a man can't provide for his family due to economic crisis, how should a wife react?

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    1. This is a significant issue in today's economy. There are situations in which husbands aren't able to provide for the needs of their families. That is when his wife becomes a true help-meet. If she is able to earn income where he cannot, she becomes his helper in a tangible way. When income is lost, that is when the family unit pulls together and helps out.

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  4. We live in a society that constantly challenges any sense of having enough. There is always the newer, bigger, better model of whatever being promoted. Advertising is the bane of satisfaction. Recently I read a quote your post made me think of, "What you want isn't always what you need and often isn't what you truly want." Providing for needs is what we are called to, and focusing on true desires rather than superficial ones. You did a great job articulating that. Thanks!

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    1. Thank you for your words of encouragement. I see a lot of dissatisfaction in my friends and even my own family with the things we have and the situation in which we find ourselves. Others around us seem to have so much, and I do my best to point my family toward Jesus instead of things for contentment. Sometimes it works, sometimes not so much.

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  5. Great point: providing is more than money. You have done a good job identifying the standards of the world. thanks.

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    1. The world thinks a lot of money and possessions. We need to get away from that thinking and realize that God sustains us and gives us everything we need. Husbands should do likewise.

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  6. I would say that is NOT an ugly $5 chair, Thomas! It has great "bones" and potential. (I love finding an antique and restoring it, by the way!) But I love your point here. I feel the same way. My husband and I don't make much but we are rich in so many other ways besides money. I feel like that's the kind of legacy I want my children to benefit from and learn from. Great thoughts, my friend! Thanks for sharing your link over at Wedded Wed. :)

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    1. Amen, Beth! There is more to providing than bringing home a large paycheck.

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